The Connection Between Food and Energy

 

 

Having energy is important. It not only helps keep you alert and promotes good school and work performance, but it’s also integral in the internal functions of your body, as well as the building, repairing and overall maintenance of cells tissues. As for how we get our energy, much of it comes from the food we eat. Foods that are salty and sweet have the tendency to mess with your blood sugar level, which can ultimately cause you to “crash” and leave you feeling even more depleted of energy, while healthier foods will have the opposite effect and will not only leave you feeling energized, but also improve your overall health.

 

First up are carbohydrates. You’re probably wondering why carbs are even being mentioned and are most likely under the impression that the word automatically means that they’re bad for you – but you’re wrong. Not all carbohydrates are bad carbohydrates. In fact, carbohydrates are the body’s main source of energy! The key is to picking carbs that are good for you. Some of the best sources of carbs include those that are whole-grain and high-fibre. Bulgur wheat, for example, contains as much as 8 grams of fibre and not only provides you with sustained energy, but also slows down digestion – meaning you’ll be less likely to want to snack on unhealthy foods between meals. Other whole grains such as barley, quinoa and oats are also considered to be healthy sources of carbohydrates. It’s important to avoid refined carbs (i.e. white rice, white bread, white pasta, white potatoes, sugary breakfast cereal, and potato chips) as they can contribute to overeating which can ultimately increase your risk of obesity. They’re also much lower in fibre and digest a lot more quickly.

 

Fruits are also something you should include more of in your diet if you’re looking to give yourself a healthy energy boost. Cantaloupe, for example, is made up of 90% water, and it’s also a great source of potassium which is one of the electrolytes that your body needs in order to have a good balance in energy and prevent you from feeling fatigued, as well as important for proper hydration. You can also improve your energy level with other fruits, such as bananas, watermelon, apples, oranges, mango, papaya, and avocado.

 

For a prolonged energy boost, you can also try eating eggs. Packed with protein and very little fat, eggs help slow down the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and will leave you feeling fuller and more energized for extended periods. Eggs can also help to stimulate what’s known as the satiety hormones, meaning you’ll have less of an urge to snack in the middle of the day. Eggs can be cooked in a variety of ways and incorporated into many meals, and you should be able to find plenty of healthy recipes in cookbooks or online – such as on Pinterest.

 

For many, caffeine is also a necessity when it comes to boosting energy. However, having a cup or two of coffee can actually make you quite jittery. If this happens to you, you should consider switching to decaffeinated coffee. While decaf coffee typically still contains some caffeine, the amount is generally significantly less. If you find you can’t do without the decrease in caffeine, you can also consider switching to matcha tea. While matcha tends to have more caffeine in it than other teas, it also contains an amino acid that’s known to provide calming effect – meaning you won’t get that jittery feeling that drinking coffee may sometimes give you. Matcha also has many other health benefits; it’s packed with antioxidants, can boot metabolism, help you to burn calories, naturally detoxifies, is rich in fibre, vitamins, zinc and magnesium, lowers cholesterol and blood sugar, prevents disease, and is also known to enhance mood and aid in concentration. It is important to note that many grocery stores carry matcha tea – however, many of them are flavoured and have added sugar. If you’re going to be drinking matcha tea, it’s important that you ensure it is natural. For some added flavour, you can always try adding a small drizzle of honey.

 

Having energy is important. It not only helps keep you alert and promotes good school and work performance, but it’s also integral in the internal functions of your body, as well as the building, repairing and overall maintenance of cells tissues. As for how we get our energy, much of it comes from the food we eat. Foods that are salty and sweet have the tendency to mess with your blood sugar level, which can ultimately cause you to “crash” and leave you feeling even more depleted of energy, while healthier foods will have the opposite effect and will not only leave you feeling energized, but also improve your overall health.

 

First up are carbohydrates. You’re probably wondering why carbs are even being mentioned and are most likely under the impression that the word automatically means that they’re bad for you – but you’re wrong. Not all carbohydrates are bad carbohydrates. In fact, carbohydrates are the body’s main source of energy! The key is to picking carbs that are good for you. Some of the best sources of carbs include those that are whole-grain and high-fibre. Bulgur wheat, for example, contains as much as 8 grams of fibre and not only provides you with sustained energy, but also slows down digestion – meaning you’ll be less likely to want to snack on unhealthy foods between meals. Other whole grains such as barley, quinoa and oats are also considered to be healthy sources of carbohydrates. It’s important to avoid refined carbs (i.e. white rice, white bread, white pasta, white potatoes, sugary breakfast cereal, and potato chips) as they can contribute to overeating which can ultimately increase your risk of obesity. They’re also much lower in fibre and digest a lot more quickly.

 

Fruits are also something you should include more of in your diet if you’re looking to give yourself a healthy energy boost. Cantaloupe, for example, is made up of 90% water, and it’s also a great source of potassium which is one of the electrolytes that your body needs in order to have a good balance in energy and prevent you from feeling fatigued, as well as important for proper hydration. You can also improve your energy level with other fruits, such as bananas, watermelon, apples, oranges, mango, papaya, and avocado.

 

For a prolonged energy boost, you can also try eating eggs. Packed with protein and very little fat, eggs help slow down the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and will leave you feeling fuller and more energized for extended periods. Eggs can also help to stimulate what’s known as the satiety hormones, meaning you’ll have less of an urge to snack in the middle of the day. Eggs can be cooked in a variety of ways and incorporated into many meals, and you should be able to find plenty of healthy recipes in cookbooks or online – such as on Pinterest.

 

For many, caffeine is also a necessity when it comes to boosting energy. However, having a cup or two of coffee can actually make you quite jittery. If this happens to you, you should consider switching to decaffeinated coffee. While decaf coffee typically still contains some caffeine, the amount is generally significantly less. If you find you can’t do without the decrease in caffeine, you can also consider switching to matcha tea. While matcha tends to have more caffeine in it than other teas, it also contains an amino acid that’s known to provide calming effect – meaning you won’t get that jittery feeling that drinking coffee may sometimes give you. Matcha also has many other health benefits; it’s packed with antioxidants, can boot metabolism, help you to burn calories, naturally detoxifies, is rich in fibre, vitamins, zinc and magnesium, lowers cholesterol and blood sugar, prevents disease, and is also known to enhance mood and aid in concentration. It is important to note that many grocery stores carry matcha tea – however, many of them are flavoured and have added sugar. If you’re going to be drinking matcha tea, it’s important that you ensure it is natural. For some added flavour, you can always try adding a small drizzle of honey.